Allele Received Broad Patent on DNA-Expressed RNAi in China

Allele Biotechnology & Pharmaceuticals, a San Diego based private company with associate offices and laboratories in China and distribution channels in 30 countries, was granted a major landmark patent in China in the field of RNA interference (RNAi). The patent CN02828345.7, issued on January 20, 2010, covers compositions of DNA molecules that can be transcribed into RNAi-mediating RNA molecules, including the commonly used shRNA and miRNA-like designs. The patent also grants Allele Biotech rights to the process of introducing such DNA molecules into cells. To induce gene silencing by RNA interference, researchers often bring DNA molecules that encode interfering RNAs into cells via plasmid or viral vectors. The rights to use related technologies for the purposes of completely or partially abolishing gene functions through the mechanism of RNAi are granted to Allele Biotech.

Additional claims include methods of studying gene functions using DNA-encoded RNAi agents, or modifying gene expression profile by introducing gene expression-altering DNA molecules that will induce RNAi. The patent further protects the use of DNA-mediated RNAi in creating cell, animal models, and for curing human diseases. According to a Nov 2009 CreditSuisse analysis on the pharmaceutical market in China (and a number of other reports by JP Morgan as well as Morgan Stanley research, etc.), the drug market in China will double by 2015 and the expected revenues for major pharmaceutical companies are in the billion US dollar range each. Many large drug developers have opened research centers in China. For instance, Novartis just announced a 1.25 billion US dollar investment in Chinese R&D centers, making Shanghai one of its top three global research centers. Roche, Pfizer, JNJ, AZN, Bayer, and LLY also have substantial investments in R&D there. Some of their research teams have plans to use the virus-carried shRNA technologies in oncology and other areas, either as screening/validation tools or as therapeutic candidates. Such activities in China are now under the Allele’s recently granted RNAi patent.

The Contract Research Organization (CRO) industry in Shanghai, Suzhou, and Beijing has seen significant growth in the past few years, benefiting from R&D cost cutting in Western countries and the flow of Western-trained researchers back into China. The focus of the CRO business also shifted from chemical synthesis towards one-stop service, including functional screening and animal testing. The clarification of the RNAi patent landscape by the current granting should make the relevant CRO applications of RNAi more mature. It should also provide both the service and the customer companies with a clear route to licensing and/or collaboration.

Most major biomedical research tool and reagent companies have established themselves in the Chinese market and seen fast-growing revenues due to large funding increases to biomedical research in China. For example, Life Technologies, Promega, Millipore, Thermo Scientific, and Sigma-Aldrich all sell RNAi kits that use DNA template for expressing shRNA in mammalian cells, either by viral infection or DNA transfection. In addition, there are many local companies in China that provide reagent kits as well as services.

The Allele patent specifically states claims on reagent kits that contain shRNA-encoding DNA molecules. While being the first in China’s RNAi market, Allele Biotech manufactures in the United States and sells world-wide a set of RNAi kits in the form of retroviral or lentiviral vectors, plasmids, and linear DNA—all of which have superior design for precise shRNA production. As a matter of fact, Allele Biotech helped introduce the RNAi concept through a series of workshops in major universities in China for 3 consecutive years since 2002, at a time when most biologists had just heard of RNAi.

Allele Biotech intends to fully realize the value of this broad patent by providing opportunities to R&D centers, service providers, and reagent sellers to license at reasonable fees, so that this great technology will continue to be widely used and further developed through original research and investment. Allele Biotech intends to set licensing fees on a sliding scale in several aspects:
–the closer a drug gets to market, the higher the fees;
–the smaller the company, the lower the fees;
–the earlier the license is negotiated within an industry sector, the lower the fees.
Allele’s attorneys in China have already been contacted to start drafting plans for licensing deals and patent rights execution. “While stressing wide access, limiting the number of licenses in China is not completely out of the question. In general we want to grant all-application, non-exclusive, low-cost licenses to many companies to keep the costs affordable.” says Dr. Jiwu Wang, Allele’s CEO and the inventor of the patents. “However, if a dominant player in a particular application area is more interested in some exclusivity, a co-exclusive or conditional exclusive license may be negotiated”.

A brief background about RNAi patents:
–The original Fire and Mello patent claimed double-stranded RNAs longer than 25, eliminating use in most mammalian cells.
–The few other RNAi patents granted in the US, Europe, Japan and other markets so far mostly concern chemically synthesized siRNAs.
–The Tuschl I and II patents, with the latter being frequently mentioned in the news because it has generated hundreds of millions of dollars in licensing fees, concern siRNAs suitable for mammalian cells, but they are either chemically synthesized or processed in cell lysate.
–The Allele patent family includes 3 issued US patents on using RNA polymerase III promoter (e.g., commonly used U6 promoter) for generating RNAi. The core of the Allele patents describes making siRNAs that can be of 19 to 25 basepairs long, which are not covered by the Fire and Mello patent. Further, these transcribed siRNA are not chemically synthesized; therefore, they do not conflict with the Tuschl patents. The Allele patent in China has an even broader field of granted rights, covering any DNA-based gene silencing using double-stranded RNA as intermediates.

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Wednesday, February 10th, 2010 Open Forum, RNAi patent landscape

4 Comments to Allele Received Broad Patent on DNA-Expressed RNAi in China

Manikandan
February 11, 2010

This news is exciting. My colleagues at Dolcera (www.dolcera.com) have created an exclusive Patent database on the RNAi space and this database of patents is rendered with the help of award winning data visualization tool i.e Patent Dashboard.

blogadmin
February 12, 2010
blogadmin
February 15, 2010

China Biotech Week in Review: Allele Biotechnology & Pharmaceuticals was granted a landmark patent with far-reaching claims in China in the RNA interference field [RNAi]
http://bx.businessweek.com/investing-in-growth-stocks/view?url=http%3A%2F%2Fseekingalpha.com%2Farticle%2F188524-china-biotech-week-in-review%3Fsource%3Dfeed

blogadmin
February 24, 2010

Eli Lilly and Co., Pfizer and Merck & Co. formed the nonprofit Asian Cancer Research Group in Singapore to speed up research and development of cancer treatments. The institute initially will create a pharmacogenomic cancer database on lung and gastric cancers that can be used by researchers worldwide.

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